Directory

Staff

Nico Preston

Amy Kamarainen

Board of Directors

Andrew Bateman

Martin Krkošek

Alexandra Morton

Stephanie Peacock

Scott Rogers

Former Staff

Heather Forbes

Chris Guinchard

Staff

Drs. Amy Kamarainen and Nico Preston are the resident coordinators at Salmon Coast Field Station on Gilford Island, Broughton Archipelago. They met as lab partners under Prof. Steve Carpenter during their doctoral studies at the Center for Limnology (CFL), University of Wisconsin, Madison. Nico is a Canadian with international roots and Amy is from the Michigan Upper Peninsula. They are passionate about wild salmon ecosystems and alarmed about threats from human activity under a changing climate. They live at the station with their infant son (Ry), two English Springer spaniels (Kew and Mobi), and mouser (Ruffy).

email: info@salmoncoast.org


Station and Education Coordinator – Amy Kamarainen

Amy is an ecosystem scientist and educator focused on supporting science learning across contexts (e.g., outdoor, classroom, online). During her doctoral work in Zoology, Amy’s fieldwork focused on human impacts on aquatic systems and contributed to the long-term ecological research network (LTER). She has been a senior research manager and principal investigator at the Harvard Graduate School of Education where she worked collaboratively on grant-based education research projects like AR Girls, a summer camp that engages teenage girls in designing augmented reality (AR) experiences about environmental issues in their communities and EcoXPT, a virtual world in which kids use science practices to investigate an ecological question. Amy is excited about bringing attention to the natural world through outdoor and immersive experiences. In her spare time, she enjoys skiing, sailing, kayaking, and hiking.


Station Coordinator – Nico Preston

Nico is a data scientist, technologist, and ecologist. He did his doctoral work in Limnology and Marine Science at the UNDERC field station in Michigan, studying the carbon budget of aquatic systems and ecosystem function through whole lake manipulations. Nico has worked as a postdoctoral scientist in the Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (UW-SAGE), Health Informatics Program (Boston Children’s Hospital), and Computer Science (UVic). His career has spanned the nonprofit, academic, startup, subsidiary, and corporate sectors; culminating as an executive with a management consulting firm in the US, punctuated by a sabbatical at Singularity University, and a return to his field roots in Canada. He is currently affiliated with the computer science department at the University of Victoria. His research interests include data science, climate change, aquatic ecology, epidemiology, disasters, and disease. Nico is driven by the potential of technology to catalyze scientific discovery and mitigate the impacts of climate change–from innovations in field equipment, to compute infrastructure and scientific instrumentation. Nico is an avid sailor and skier with a passion for messing around with boats and all things aquatic.

Board of Directors

Andrew Bateman

Happy Uni AndrewAndrew Bateman is currently a postdoctoral fellow working with Chris Darimont at the University of Victoria.  He uses mathematical models, paired with data, to ask ecological questions. He currently studies how food availability and sociality affect patterns of population change in northern resident killer whales.  After first coming to Salmon Coast Field Station in 2008 to help look into the effects of chemical treatment on salmon farms, he now also investigates the potential for sea lice in BC to evolve resistance to the chemicals used to control their abundance, and the associated impacts on farmed and wild salmon.  He is excited by the role that Salmon Coast can play in connecting people and facilitating research that is important to conservation, management, and local communities.


Martin Krkošek

KrkosekDr. Martin Krkošek is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Toronto, having recently finished his posting as a lecturer in zoology at the University of Otago, New Zealand. He completed his PhD in 2008 on the conservation ecology of sea lice and salmon in British Columbia, under the supervision of Dr. Mark Lewis (Canada Research Chair in mathematical biology at the University of Alberta) and Dr. John Volpe (Seafood Ecology Research Group at the University of Victoria). He was awarded a Governor General’s Gold Medal for his doctoral dissertation. Martin’s interests lie in the sustainability and conservation of coastal systems, particularly as influenced by infectious disease. He uses mathematical tools in his work by developing theory and synthesizing datasets to address important policy relevant questions. Much of Martin’s work focuses on how salmon aquaculture changes the ecology of a native host-parasite system (sea lice and salmon), and how this affects the conservation of wild Pacific salmon.


Alexandra Morton

alex photo

Alexandra (Hubbard) Morton was born in 1957. Her childhood dream to study animals led her to study killer whales, first in an aquarium in Los Angeles, then in their natural setting in British Columbia. Following a captive whale’s family into Johnstone Strait, she moved to the Broughton Archipelago in 1980. Alexandra and her late husband, filmmaker, Robin Morton, moved to Echo Bay in 1984, led by the matriarch orca, Scimitar. Alexandra’s research began by publishing on the transient orca, but has since become a renowned scientific voice with regards to salmon and aquaculture. While her research on whales continues, she believes that, at some point, one must move from researching to ensuring that their research subject survives the current decade. Thus, she has spent a lifetime working to scientifically determine if salmon farming had driven out the whales and caused epidemic outbreaks of bacteria, viral and parasitic infections in wild salmon. By partnering with international scientists and in some cases commercial fishermen, Alexandra has documented the loss of killer whales, thousands of escaped farm salmon, lethal outbreaks of sea lice, and antibiotic resistance near salmon farms.


Stephanie Peacock

Stephanie Peacock

Stephanie Peacock is a population ecologist who first connected with Salmon Coast as an undergraduate summer student in 2006. That experience not only made her want to carry on in research, but brought her back to the Broughton for a PhD on the complex relationship between salmon aquaculture, sea lice, and juvenile salmon. Stephanie is currently an NSERC postdoctoral fellow at the University of Calgary, where she’s researching the host-parasite dynamics of migratory species including salmon and barren-ground caribou. As a board member, Stephanie hopes to give back to the Salmon Coast community that has inspired her career and continue to work with young and inspired scientists on coastal conservation problems.


Scott Rogers

email: scott@salmoncoast.org

kA4GQ0LoMHGL_nsK80LTbpidB5OixQGA443teFoKxIR0-4VMJOPgEiLkDoHiVQLCswcn8g=s190Working for this coast, Scott prioritizes her work around projects and organizations whose goals emphasize the protection and reinvigoration of this coastline, both through research and education. Scott came to the Broughton Archipelago as a research volunteer, determined to see first-hand the scientific findings regarding aquaculture and its impacts on wild salmon. As research progressed and Salmon Coast evolved, she chose to continue working for the Broughton ecosystems, contributing to the research that has helped protect its salmon and ecosystems. For Scott, it has been an amazing opportunity to work with top minds in the field and to witness the interface between research and management. Through participation with local communities, the research community, and visitors to the area, Scott hopes to continue keeping this research alive, and aiding to provide future opportunities for other keen researchers.

Former Staff

Former Station Coordinator – Heather Forbes

Heather PhotoHeather was raised in Merville on Vancouver Island. Her family has roots on Lasqueti Island, where three generations of her family have worked as commercial fishermen and shipbuilders. As such, she feels a strong passion for supporting the inspiring and resilient people, creatures, and places of the BC coast. Before coming to Salmon Coast, her work focused on supporting urban Aboriginal people, including roles at Vancouver Native Housing, Vancouver Aboriginal Child & Family Services, and Aboriginal Affairs. Most recently, she served as Communication & Fund Development Coordinator at First United, a low-barrier shelter and service provider in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. She holds a BA in Communication from Simon Fraser University, graduated from the Next Up leadership program, and is currently completing a MA in Community Development at the University of Victoria. She loves clamming, foraging and gardening.


Former Station Coordinator – Chris Guinchard

Chris 1Chris Guinchard was raised on two of Canada’s beautiful coasts, and can’t seem to keep himself away from the ocean. He is a jack of all trades who possesses strong mechanical and maintenance skills, which he gained through seven years of service in the Canadian Naval Reserve, as well as diverse jobs in the maintenance, manufacturing, and construction sectors. Inspired by his time working, volunteering, and playing in the Broughton Archipelago and Salmon Coast, Chris completed a diploma at British Columbia Institute of Technology’s Fish, Wildlife, and Recreation program. He also holds a BA in Sociology from York University. Chris brings his broad skill set and enthusiasm for people and learning to his role as Station Coordinator where he works to find that point where community and ecology become one. His interests include boats, bikes, and building stuff.